Lesson 7: Review of All about Banking Unit (The Unfair Game)
Secondary, Unit 2: All about Banking, Lesson 7—Review

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Lesson 7: Review of All about Banking Unit (The Unfair Game)

THE UNFAIR GAME

In The Unfair Game, each question is assigned a unique point value, and the point value can be positive OR negative. No one except for the teacher knows the point value of the question until after the answer is given—and even after the correct answer is given, teams won’t know whether the points are positive (e.g., +20) or negative (e.g., -20). Teams must decide before finding out whether the point value is positive or negative whether they want to keep the points or give them to the other team. Then they have to just cross their fingers and hope that their choice works out in their favor!

SET UP THE GAME

  1. Have your students get into groups of two and on two index cards, write two questions with answers related to this unit. Number each question.
  2. Assign a positive or negative point value to each question at random (I stick to values between -10 and +10 or so). I write them in invisible ink or a faded yellow sharpie so students cannot see the positive or negative point value.
  3. Create some kind of a game board in which only the question numbers are visible (students cannot see the question or the point value assigned to it). For example,

HOW TO PLAY

  1. Divide your class into two teams: Team A and Team B (they can choose a name for their team, if they wish). 
  2. Think of a number between 1-100 and have each team guess to see which one gets to choose a question first. Let’s imagine that Team A guesses the number closest to the one that you chose and therefore gets to pick the question first.
  3. Explain the objective: When all questions have been answered (or you run out of time), whichever team has the closest POSITIVE score to zero is declared the winner. (Ex: A team with a score of +2 beats a team with a score of -1 because the score must be positive, even though -1 is closer to 0 than +2.
  4. The first team (Team A, in this example) selects a question number.
  5. The teacher reads the corresponding question aloud.
  6. Team A attempts to answer the question correctly.
  7. After Team A answers the question, the teacher states whether the answer was “correct” or “incorrect” (revealing the correct answer if the team answered incorrectly).
  8. The teacher then reveals the point value of the question—but not whether the points are positive or negative (e.g., +20, -20).
  9. If Team A answered correctly, Team A chooses whether to keep the points or to award them to Team B. If Team A answered the question incorrectly, then Team B chooses what to do with the points from that question (to keep them or assign them to Team A).
  10. A secretary then adds the positive or negative point value to the designated team’s score on a score sheet.
  11. Regardless of whether or not Team A answered their question correctly, Team B now chooses a question, and game play repeats from Step #4 – 10.
  12. Play until all questions have been answered or you run out of time!