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Feb 3, 2022

Stash’s February 2022 IPO Calendar

By Stash Team

Find out about some noteworthy IPOs from the past month and coming up.

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Check out Stash’s initial public offering (IPO) calendar, which includes public offerings from the past month, as well as offerings expected in the next 15 days. We’ve included companies with a market cap of $500 million or more. These might be available on Stash’s platform once they trade on the stock market.* We’ll update this information with upcoming offerings each month, using the same criteria. 

*Stash is not endorsing any of the IPOs mentioned below. Stash does not offer the ability to participate in IPOs and encourages you to research any company yourself prior to investing. This calendar is for informational purposes only and is not a recommendation of any security. Stash is under no obligation to offer any investment listed on its platform. Following an IPO, the price of the newly issued stock can move significantly, so it’s especially important to remember the Stash Way®.

Updated February 8, 2022

January 13, 2022

TPG Inc., TPG

  • The alternative asset management firm has approximately $109 billion in assets under management as of Sept. 30, 2021. Based in Fort Worth, Texas, it sold 33.9 million shares at $29.50 per share. 

January 27, 2022

Credo Technology Group Holding Ltd. CRDO

  • The company provides high-speed connectivity solutions that help improve cost and power efficiency in data infrastructure in both consumer and business markets. Based in the Cayman Islands, the company sold 20 million shares at $10 each.

February 4, 2022

Arcellx Inc., ACLX

  • The biotechnology company, which is based in Gaithersburg, Maryland, develops cell therapies for cancer and other incurable diseases. Arcellx sold 8.3 million shares at $15 a share.

February 10, 2022

SQL Technologies Corp., SKYX

Doing business as Sky Technologies Corp., the company produces technology that allows electrically wired products to be quickly installed into outlet boxes without touching wires. The company also produces components that can turn electronic ceiling devices into smart devices. Based in Johns Creek, Georgia, Sky sold 1.7 million shares at $14 per share.

Information about IPOs

Companies begin trading on a public stock exchange through a process called an initial public offering (IPO). 

A company might go public to raise money to expand the company, to build new locations, or hire more people. Going public can allow the company to raise a lot of money quickly. 

When a company decides to go public, it’ll work with an investment bank such as Goldman Sachs or J.P. Morgan in a process called underwriting. The bank will make sure all of the proper documents are prepared and find people who want to invest in the company through initial shares or IPO shares. Before the company goes public, it must file with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), which is a federal agency in charge of regulating the company and keeping the company informed on those regulations and rules. Once the company goes public with SEC approval, it has to issue quarterly financial statements on the health of the company so that investors can stay informed. 

Although it’s a less common approach to going public, a company can also choose to take its stock public through a direct listing.The company is still required to file with the SEC, but  when a company lists shares directly, it doesn’t use a bank to go public. Instead, early investors in the company choose to sell their shares to the public. A direct listing allows the stock exchange to dictate the price of shares. By contrast, with a traditional IPO, the bank that underwrites the IPO will set an initial share price. 

Good to know: Companies usually have a lock-up period following an IPO. A  lockup period is when company insiders, such as employees granted stock options or executives who own shares, sign an agreement that prohibits them from selling shares for a specified period of time, often a period of six months. When lockup periods expire, insiders or other early investors may want to sell their stock in order to make a profit from their shares. When these insiders start to sell their shares, sometimes that can cause a company’s stock price to fall. Companies that go public through a direct listing typically do not have lock up periods.

Following an IPO, stock exchanges such as the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) or the Nasdaq will list the stock so that investors can purchase shares of the newly listed stock. If you’re an investor, it’s important to know when companies are going public and the price at which they’re expected to trade if you’re interested in investing in those new companies. 

Following an IPO, the price of the newly issued stock can move significantly, so it’s especially important to remember the Stash Way®.

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